Today’s Housing Bubble Post – Is Your Money Safe?

Fallout from the bursting of the housing bubble is rippling further and further out. In the last few days three state government funds have realized they are in big trouble and are experiencing “runs.” And as a result, in the next few days we are likely to hear about the same thing happening in many other states. These are funds that cities put their cash into until it is needed to pay city employees, teachers, etc. The cities have people who understand finance watching the money, and they understood this so they started getting their money out. And because the fund had lost some of the money in mortgage-backed securities, it couldn’t give money back to all of the cities, and had to say “no more withdrawals until this gets sorted out.” The ones who asked for their cash first are OK, the ones who didn’t will lose out.
This is exactly what could happen to money markets and banks as people realize this is their money everyone is talking about in the news. YOUR money. Find out where your money is, your parents’ money, etc..
Florida moves to stop run on fund

The crisis underscores how the upheaval in credit markets could spread to affect mainstream investors, institutions and their employees. In recent weeks, local authorities in regions as disparate as Australia and Norway have reported similar problems.
[. . .] Most of the securities were short-term debt backed by mortgages and other assets, and issued by off-balance sheet investment vehicles, many of which have run aground in the credit squeeze. Lehman Brothers sold most of the distressed assets to the Florida fund, people familiar with the sales said.

and Florida freezes $15 billion fund as subprime crisis hits,

Florida halted withdrawals from a $15 billion local-government fund Thursday after concerns over losses related to subprime mortgages prompted investors to pull roughly $10 billion out of the fund in recent weeks.
. . . The decision shows how far this year’s subprime-fueled credit crisis has spread. Florida’s Local Government Investment Pool, which had more than $27 billion in assets at the end of September, is like a money-market fund that’s supposed to invest in ultrasafe assets to provide participants with a secure place to stash spare cash. But even these types of funds have been hit by the widening crunch.
“It’s spreading into areas that people didn’t expect and this is a good example,” Richard Larkin, a municipal bond expert at JB Hanauer & Co., said.

Maine Treasurer Criticizes Merrill for Subprime Bet,

Controversy is heating up in the state over who is at fault for having put $20 million, about 3 percent, of the state’s roughly $725 million cash pool this summer into an investment fund called Mainsail II — two weeks before its sterling ratings crumbled to junk.
The investment met all of the state’s investment criteria, but exposed the state to the mortgage market-related losses that have roiled credit markets for a few months.

And Run on Montana Fund,

Montana school districts, cities and counties withdrew $247 million from the state’s $2.4 billion investment fund over the past three days after officials said the rating on one of the pool’s holdings was lowered to default.

But don’t think for even a minute this is limited to state government funds. It’s just that the municipalities that had cash in those funds understood what was happening. MANY holders of money, especially money-market funds are in exactly the same situation, except the depositors in money-market funds are not necessarily as sophisticated as municipal finance officers, and don’t yet realize what all of this means.
But it is starting to hit the news.
How safe is your money market fund?,

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