Everything I’m Reading

Everything I’m reading about our nation’s meat inspection system and (lack of) efforts to prevent “mad cow” from infecting people tells me that profits not only came before concerns for public safety, but that profits were the only concern, and safety was no concern. These people running our government do not care about us at all. The people managing industries like the beef industry care only about tomorrow’s profits. Their shortsighted greed may have destroyed their entire industry.

This story, for example, is worth reading. Expert Warned That Mad Cow Was Imminent,

“Ever since he identified the bizarre brain-destroying proteins that cause mad cow disease, Dr. Stanley Prusiner, a neurologist at the University of California at San Francisco, has worried about whether the meat supply in America is safe.

He spoke over the years of the need to increase testing and safety measures. Then in May, a case of mad cow disease appeared in Canada, and he quickly sought a meeting with Ann M. Veneman, the secretary of agriculture. He was rebuffed, he said in an interview yesterday, until he ran into Karl Rove, senior adviser to President Bush.

So six weeks ago, Dr. Prusiner, who won the 1997 Nobel Prize in Medicine for his work on prions, entered Ms. Veneman’s office with a message. “I went to tell her that what happened in Canada was going to happen in the United States,” Dr. Prusiner said. “I told her it was just a matter of time.”

The department had been willfully blind to the threat, he said. The only reason mad cow disease had not been found here, he said, is that the department’s animal inspection agency was testing too few animals. Once more cows are tested, he added, “we’ll be able to understand the magnitude of our problem.”

This nation should immediately start testing every cow that shows signs of illness and eventually every single cow upon slaughter, he said he told Ms. Veneman. Japan has such a program and is finding the disease in young asymptomatic animals.

Fast, accurate and inexpensive tests are available, Dr. Prusiner said, including one that he has patented through his university.

Ms. Veneman’s response (he said she did not share his sense of urgency) left him frustrated. That frustration soared this week after a cow in Washington State was tentatively found to have the disease. If the nation had increased testing and inspections, meat from that cow might never have entered the food chain, he said.”